Open Science Champions

Our open science champions are labs or individuals within the ASAP network who have demonstrated a strong commitment to open science in their work to advance PD research and have been recognized by ASAP and their peers for their work.  

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Regina Reynolds | Team Hardy and Team Wood
Raquel Real | Team Hardy

Regina and Raquel both demonstrated amazing commitments to open science practices and ASAP policies when posting their most recent preprints, requiring no open science revisions for their pre-prints.  

Regina is a postdoctoral fellow on Teams Hardy and Wood. In the Ryten Lab at University College London, she is interested in the regulation of gene expression and splicing. Check out her most recent preprint here

Raquel is a postdoctoral fellow on Team Hardy. In the Morris Lab at University College London, she is interested in genetic sequencing data and rare variation, phenotype variation and progression, and clinical cohorts. Read her latest preprint here.

Thierry Voet | Team Voet
Mina Ryten | Team Hardy and Team Wood
Oke Avwenagha | Team Hardy
Shinjini Mukherjee | Team Voet

Realizing there was an opportunity to establish robust datasets and align for future meta-analysis, the leaders of the Postmortem Brain Tissue Sequencing working group (now renamed the Multi-omics working group) brought 10 teams from across the CRN working on different postmortem brain sample sequencing projects together to align on samples being used, protocols, code & pipeline workflows and data repositories.

The working group leads, Thierry (Lead PI, Team Voet), Mina (Co-PI, Team Hardy and Team Wood), Oke (Project Manager, Team Hardy) and Shinjini (Project Manager, Team Voet) have demonstrated how collaborations such as these in the pursuit of open science can lead to tangible results.

Cecilia Arlehamn | Team Sulzer

Cecilia Arlehamn is a Co-Principal Investigator on Team Sulzer, where she studies how the immune system (specifically T cells) can contribute to underlying pathology for Parkinson’s disease. Recently, her lab explored how T cells from those living with PD can react to alpha-synuclein. Although the findings were recently published, she had posted a preprint of these findings, the protocols, and datasets over 8 months ago and discussed them during scientific meetings. We applaud Cecilia’s commitment to sharing early findings and methods.

Florian De Rop | Team Voet

Florian De Rop is a member of the Stein Aerts lab at the Collaborative Research Network (CRN). He demonstrates a commitment to open science through his continued engagement with the protocols.io community. As a frequent uploader to the platform, including protocols for execution of HyDrop-ATACproducing microfluid chips, and producing dissolvable and barcoded hydrogel beads, Florian actively responds to comments from viewers and does not hesitate to update his protocols in order to provide additional details and clarification.

The Global Parkinson’s Genetics Program (GP2)

GP2 is committed to increasing ancestral diversity in genetic Parkinson’s research. A central tenet to this project is to build a global interactive research network steeped in open science principles. GP2 recently developed a dashboard to transparently track their progress, has started releasing completed datasets onto the AMP® PD platform for others to use, and developed training materials on how to analyze the data. We wanted to celebrate the leadership of GP2 for embracing open science and the mission of ASAP.

Catherine Oikonomou | Team Gradinaru

Catherine Oikonomou is a project manager of the Collaborative Research Network’s (CRN) Team Gradinaru. She was the first project manager in the Circuitry and Brain-Body Interactions theme to start cataloging the resources of her Team for others within our network to leverage. Check out some of the plasmids for genetically encoded sensors shared by Lin Tian on her team or protocols for intact circuit mapping and subcellular component phenotyping.

Dario Alessi | Team Alessi

For multiple teams in the network, Dario Alessi has been consistently mentioned as a great collaborator—someone who is always willing to share tools and exchange ideas to accelerate discovery in Parkinson’s. Moreover, although not required by ASAP policies, Dario Alessi’s team have proactively shared informational updates around their monthly lab meetings for anyone in the ASAP network to learn from. Their team has also initiated the LRRK2_Central series to stimulate discussions around LRRK2 not just within ASAP, but for the whole scientific community.

Dorotea Fracchiolla headshot

Dorotea Fracchiolla | Team Hurley

Dorotea (Doro) Fracchiolla spearheads the Mito911 Webinar Series, initiated by Team Hurley, which highlights the latest research on Mitochondria & Neurodegeneration throughout the year. She has also catalogued 115 different research outputs that others in the research network can leverage (including 71 Plasmids and 35 Protocols). On an unrelated note, she is also a fantastic scientific illustrator–as anyone who attends her meetings knows from the intro summary slides. Her work was recently featured on the cover of Molecular Cell’s November issue. 

De Camilli Lab | Team De Camilli

In the first year of their ASAP award, the lab drafted four manuscripts. The first was published in the early phases of the funding when grantees were less familiar with ASAP’s progressive open science policies. They were the only team at that time to quickly follow up with a corrigendum to the journal to ensure that the deposited data and protocols were also linked in the manuscript. And they have consistently reached out well in advance (even prior to preprint posting) to undergo an ASAP open access compliance check. 

ASAP recognizes the De Camilli lab for their commitment to ensuring their research outputs are accessible and discoverable to the research community!

Alex Henderson | Team Studer

Alex reached out to ASAP staff asking to take the lead on standardizing some of the QC iPSC efforts across the network. Currently, he is working with Gist Croft and Tim Ahfeldt to survey our network, develop initial QC recommendations and establish minimal criteria for defining differentiated cell types using cell markers and functional assays across the multiple groups using iPSCs. These processes are critical to future meta-data analysis resulting from our ASAP teams working with iPSCs. Additionally, Alex has posted many of the Team’s protocols on Protocols.io.

ASAP celebrates Alex’s commitment to ensuring that all research outputs—regardless of being funded by ASAP—are being made accessible and discoverable to the PD community at large!

Harper Lab | Team Harper

On July 19th, the Harper lab posted their “Quantitative proteomics reveals the selectivity of ubiquitin-binding autophagy receptors in the turnover of damaged lysosomes by lysophagy” preprint. After sending it to ASAP for a compliance check, they quickly updated it to include a data availability statement highlighting that their mass spectrometry proteomics data is deposited in PRIDE as well as sharing the tabular source data in supplemental figures.

ASAP commends team Harper lab’s responsiveness to ensuring that datasets are made available. Check the article out (now published), and in case you missed it, check out the tweetorial by first-author Vinay Eapen highlighting Harper Lab’s work.

Stein Aerts Lab | Team Voet

In June 2021, the lab posted a new preprint around HyDrop, a new, flexible and open-source droplet microfluidic protocol for single-cell RNA- and single-cell ATAC sequencing. They also shared all associated research outputs (new code, protocols, and datasets) with their preprint.

Within a month of posting there were: 

  • Over 3,500 preprint views
  • Over 1,200 preprint downloads
  • Over 130 tweets about the preprint
  • Over 200 unique protocol views, bookmarking, and multiple exports 

The lab has also developed its own website for related outputs to the preprint so that anyone can replicate or re-use the methods they developed. ASAP celebrates Stein Aerts lab for their commitment to open science.

Follow ASAP on Twitter and LinkedIn to learn more about our researchers, and keep up with the latest in this series.